Tag: OUT FRONT Series

Thursday, January 15, 10:14 PM written by About Face Theatre

Behind the interviews: Kyla N.

At the end of January, AFT will proudly present the first public reading of the beginning portions of STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY, a new project led by AFT Artistic Associate, Kelli Simpkins. The piece uses a collection of 50 interviews conducted over a five month period with intergenerational members of the Chicago LGBTQIA community and those advocating for youth and seniors. In the weeks leading up to the show, we will be sharing posts from a few of these folks to share their perspective on the piece and why they wanted to be involved.
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INTERVIEW #3: Kyla N.

What inspired you to become part of this project?

The resonance it had with the community as a whole, especially within the LGBTQIA community. Across generations of oppressed and marginalized people, loneliness is a daily part of life. This piece is inspiring because it speaks to the similarities among groups of people thought to have nothing in common. This project will give youth, elders, and everyone in between common ground because we all know what it is to be isolated. This project will bring light to these profound yet simple human emotions that haunt the fringes of society. It is enlightening to share the most vulnerable part of yourself to strangers in hopes that they will connect deeply with a piece of art no matter what community they identify with.

How would you explain this problem of loneliness within the LGBTQIA community to someone unfamiliar with the issue?

Loneliness in the LGBTQIA community is isolation by discrimination. This community is plagued by othering. People in the LGBTQIA community are constantly being left out of the idea of normalcy. Society holds tightly to it’s strict gender binaries and heteronormativity. This pushes people within this community into isolation because holding their girlfriend’s hand on the CTA grants looks from strangers, because wearing a dress could potentially get someone beaten to a pulp, because according to many people, the LGBTQIA community is not valid. It’s tough to hear someone tell you that you are not valid, that you are somehow fundamentally flawed. LGBTQIA in both the young and older communities become isolated. They feel lonely. They are called names and meant to feel “weird” for being who they are. It is isolating to think that who you are is wrong. If this is the case, then you will never be “right” or “normal” because that goes against who you fundamentally are. The denial of who we are leads to isolation and denial of self. LGBTQIA people feel as if they are the only ones who feel this way, that they cannot relate nor will they ever feel as if their thoughts and feelings are valid. The fear of being different drives this loneliness that leaves LGBTQIA feeling isolated and alone. Too often it feels as if there is no way out, that there will always be an uphill battle with the ones around you and ultimately with yourself. This is why loneliness is so deeply rooted in the LGBTQIA community.

How do you hope the piece will ultimately build community or change around this issue?

I hope this piece will get people in the LGBTQIA community to rally around one another, to increase the support for one another. Community can dilute loneliness. I hope this piece brings people outside of the community who will fight to uplift the LGBTQIA community. Not only to uplift, but to really connect to the loneliness and understand how much worse it may be. I want this to turn apathetic people outside of the community, into spokespeople for what the new idea of normal really is. To be normal is to be true to yourself. I also hope that this can strengthen the existing community and provide common ground for youth and elders despite the differences. I hope this project strengthens the existing community and embraces the people in the intersections as we look toward the future.

At this phase, the piece primarily explores the voices of young people and seniors in the community. What is one thing you’d like to tell to your younger self about life/love/community?

The future, without a doubt, will be better as long you are dedicated to creating it. This future can only happen if you are dedicated to being the best person you can be, staying true to yourself, loving yourself and giving back to the community from which you took. Don’t forget the importance of your community. Know that there is always work to be done. Never stop believing in the power of art. Never buy into apathy.

The piece also aims to find common ground between generations, so with that in mind, what is one thing you would want an elder community member to know about you?

I am still fighting for the community’s validity and I am standing on the shoulders of many people like you, who fought just to be seen.

Kyla is an actor, playwright and director in Chicago and is a member of About Face Theatre’s Youth Task Force.
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OutFront-SUND

OUT FRONT: STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY
by AFT Artistic Associate Kelli Simpkins
JANUARY 24th @ 7:00pm & JANUARY 25th @ 3:00pm
Center on Halsted | 3656 N Halsted St in Chicago

Register now to reserve your seat!

To help About Face nurture new work like STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY, please consider making a $10 donation when you reserve your ticket.

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Wednesday, January 14, 11:52 PM written by AFT Theatre

Behind the interviews: Eric A.

At the end of January, AFT will proudly present the first public reading of the beginning portions of STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY, a new project led by AFT Artistic Associate, Kelli Simpkins. The piece uses a collection of 50 interviews conducted over a five month period with intergenerational members of the Chicago LGBTQIA community and those advocating for youth and seniors. In the weeks leading up to the show, we will be sharing posts from a few of these folks to share their perspective on the piece and why they wanted to be involved.
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INTERVIEW #2: Eric A.

What inspired you to become part of this project?

Initially SK reached out to me about this project. They didn’t get too in depth about what it was about. Once I was informed, I thought about how interesting the concept would be. The thought of loneliness in our community is something I would never have given a second thought to. In answering the questions, I got really emotional and started crying just thinking of issues that impact our community. I was inspired to lend my voice to our community. Art heals! Whether it be music, paintings, poetry readings, singing, drag – whatever it is! I’ve seen what About Face Theatre has done. Every time I leave a show of theirs, it really gets me thinking about the bigger picture of the issues in the plays. I was more than happy to bring a new play of theirs in About Face-style into fruition.

How would you explain this problem of loneliness within the LGBTQIA community to someone unfamiliar with the issue?

In our community, we experience isolation from the moment we realize our sexual identity. We become liars out of the fear of our most nurtured secrets. We learn to become our own security blanket, best friend, and our guard is always up. In putting our energies into our own protection we lose ourselves in the process. The world becomes a lonely place at this time. It makes me sad writing this and thinking about it because I know from experience this used to be my case. It feels like acceptance could be taken away in a matter of seconds. Friends you thought would be with you for a long time dissipate, family could look at you like you were a different person, people can call you names as you go about your daily life – and for what reason? Because you love the same gender or in other cases you don’t feel you were born in the correct gender you were assigned. This is what loneliness is in our community.

How do you hope the piece will ultimately build community or change around this issue?

I hope that it makes people in our community bond. I’m aware of the shade that goes on. I hope that it can make everyone in the Queer alphabet soup join hands and walk through this journey together as brother and sister. I know this sounds like a church preaching but that would make me extremely happy. We need to fix our community internally so we can be a force to be reckoned with againest oppression.

At this phase, the piece primarily explores the voices of young people and seniors in the community. What is one thing you’d like to tell to your younger self about life/love/community?

Life continues on, love always has a way to find you, and community will always back you up in times of strain.

Eric is a cast member of the online show QueerCode and is involved in HIV counseling and testing at Calor, a non-profit that provides HIV and AIDS serviced to the Latino and Hispanic community in Chicago.
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OutFront-SUND

OUT FRONT: STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY
by AFT Artistic Associate Kelli Simpkins
JANUARY 24th @ 7:00pm & JANUARY 25th @ 3:00pm
Center on Halsted | 3656 N Halsted St in Chicago

Register now to reserve your seat!

To help About Face nurture new work like STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY, please consider making a $10 donation when you reserve your ticket.

Read more

Wednesday, January 14, 11:06 PM written by AFT Theatre

Behind the interviews: Bruce K.

At the end of January, AFT will proudly present the first public reading of the beginning portions of STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY, a new project led by AFT Artistic Associate, Kelli Simpkins. The piece uses a collection of 50 interviews conducted over a five month period with intergenerational members of the Chicago LGBTQIA community and those advocating for youth and seniors. In the weeks leading up to the show, we will be sharing posts from a few of these folks to share their perspective on the piece and why they wanted to be involved.
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INTERVIEW #1: BRUCE K.

What inspired you to become part of this project?

When Kelli told me about the project, I was drawn to the notion that loneliness can be an experience that young and old share and might address together. Having traversed the path from a gay youth to a gay senior, I imagine that the challenges of finding meaningful connections could create a bond between LGBTQIA youth and older adults. I like that idea, and I’d like to believe that we can learn from each other.

How would you explain this problem of loneliness within the LGBTQIA community to someone unfamiliar with the issue?

Of course, loneliness can be a product of modern life. The ties of extended families weaken, the power of friendship dissipates, and our greatest access to community is often reduced to “liking” or “friending” someone on a smartphone. But I think that LGBTQIA people are also vulnerable to feeling lonely as a legacy of homophobia. Sadly, as a psychotherapist and social service professional, I hear the lament of loneliness almost as much from today’s LGBTQIA young people as I did from my own generation. In spite of all the progress we’ve made toward securing our rights, the truth is that many LGBTQ youth continue to experience rejection, ostracism, harassment and violence that is fueled by homophobia. The result can be a lifetime of fear and insecurity that leads to not only alienation from others, but also alienation from one’s self. Within these lie the seeds of loneliness.

For LGBTQIA seniors, that legacy may persist and be amplified by the stigma of aging as well as by the profound losses that are part of the aging process. As I age, I am aware of my diminishing circle and my fears of being abandoned or alone. This need not be our destiny, but that will require a different vision of LGBTQIA aging that includes connection with those who are different from us by virtue of age and/or other qualities and dimensions.

How do you hope the piece will ultimately build community or change around this issue?

I would hope that the piece will build connection; bridges of empathy based on shared experience, mutual respect and care. I also hope that it will generate a will to create structures that reduce loneliness and alienation among and between young and old. Each has so much to give to the other which could prove so valuable in this time of otherwise tenuous connections.

At this phase, the piece primarily explores the voices of young people and seniors in the community. What is one thing you’d like to tell to your younger self about life/love/community?

We are here to love in one form or another; get on with it. Don’t let all the other challenges of life deter you, embitter you, or cause you to minimize the importance of this.

The piece also aims to find common ground between generations, so with that in mind, what is one thing you would want a young community member to know about you?

I guess I would start by acknowledging difference. I am a product of my times just as you will be a product of yours. The lessons of my life may not suit you. Consequently, I cannot adequately prepare you for what lies ahead in your life. Still, I did my best and I like what I have become, so if there are any lessons of my life that may be useful to you, I’m happy to share them. Regardless, as I am grateful to those who came before me for all the good they created and the sacrifices they made, so I hope you will be mindful of those who came before you. We came here to love, just like you, and were fortunate to have expanded the space in which that could occur. We did that for us and for you. Build on it. We can help (just ask!), but the next steps are yours.

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OutFront-SUND

OUT FRONT: STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY
by AFT Artistic Associate Kelli Simpkins
JANUARY 24th @ 7:00pm & JANUARY 25th @ 3:00pm
Center on Halsted | 3656 N Halsted St in Chicago

Register now to reserve your seat!

To help About Face nurture new work like STANDING UNDERNEATH NIGHT AND DAY, please consider making a $10 donation when you reserve your ticket.

Read more

Thursday, January 16, 1:01 PM written by EmilyHaha

AFT’s OUT FRONT Series: when last we flew

About Face Theatre’s OUT FRONT SERIES Presents

when last we flew

By Harrison David Rivers

Directed by Lisa Portes

January 25 & 26, 2014 at Stage 773

 

We’re pleased to continue our OUT FRONT SERIES, a year-round collection of free public readings and developmental workshops, with when last we flew by Harrison David Rivers, directed by Lisa Portes, playing Saturday, January 25 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, January 26 at 3 pm at Stage 773, 1225 W. Belmont Ave. in Chicago.

when last we flew will feature About Face Artistic Associate Kelli Simpkins with Nathan Cooper, Ashleigh Lathrop, Jerry McKinnon, Sean Parris, and others.

Inspired by Tony Kushner’s Angels in America and a testament to the power of theatre, when last we flew is a moving and often humorous look at life in small town America from a contemporary teenage perspective.  After stealing his local library’s only copy of Angels in America, misfit teenager Paul locks himself in the bathroom to begin reading the landmark play. He soon finds that his life and the lives of those around him in his small Kansas town are about to take flight, and over the course of a seemingly ordinary day, extraordinary things start to happen…

The OUT FRONT SERIES is FREE: however, reservations are strongly recommended. Click here to reserve your seats online or call (773) 784-8565.

About the Playwright:

Harrison David Rivers is a Harlem based playwright. His play when last we flew (About Face Theatre, Diversionary Theatre, NYFringe, Sundance Theatre Lab, Lincoln Center Directors’ Lab) received the 2011 GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Off Off Broadway Play, the 2010 FringeNYC Excellence in Playwriting Award and was named one of the Top 10 LGBTQ 2010 FringeNYC productions by The Advocate. Other plays include: The Bandaged Place (Aurora Theatre Company Global Age Project, Classical Theater of Harlem, Harlem Stage, New York Theatre Workshop/Dartmouth); lydie, or (s)he who looks inside, awakes (Lincoln Center Directors’ Lab, Williamstown, New Dramatists); Sweet (New York Theatre Workshop, The Public Theater); And She Said, He Said, I Said Yes (Joe’s Pub, HERE Arts Center); We Are Misquoted Texts (Under St. Marks, 3-Legged Dog, Dixon Place); Jack Perry is Alive (And Dating) (New York Musical Theatre Festival, Ars Nova ANT Fest); THE SEA & THE STARS (National Black Theatre); and Look Upon Our Lowliness (New York Theatre Workshop, The Movement Theatre Company). Harrison’s short plays have been produced at The Public Theater, Atlantic Theater, Atlantic Stage 2, Second Stage, Playwrights Horizons, Dixon Place, the 45th Street Theater, Harlem School for the Arts and the American Airlines Theater on Broadway. His monologue play Not Resentful At All was presented as part of Headlong Theatre Company’s 2011 production of Decade directed by Rupert Goold. The piece is also published in “Decade: An Anthology of New Plays About the Legacy of 9/11”. Harrison is the recipient of Van Lier (New Dramatists) and Emerging Artist of Color Fellowships (New York Theatre Workshop) and the John Golden Playwriting Award. He was a finalist for the Alec Baldwin Singers Forum Fellowship, the New York Stage & Film Founder’s Award, the Old Vic/New Voices US/UK Playwrights Exchange and a semi-finalist for the P73 Playwriting Fellowship. Harrison is a New York Theatre Workshop Usual Suspect and an alumnus of the 2012-13 Emerging Writers Group at The Public Theater. MFA, Columbia University.

About the Director

Lisa Portes serves a head of directing at the Theatre School at DePaul University and artistic director of Chicago Playworks for Young Audiences.  Primarily a director of new American work, her recent projects include: Concerning Strange Devices from the Distant West by Naomi Iizuka (Timeline Theatre), the world premieres of Ghostwritten by Naomi Iizuka (Goodman Theatre), After 100 Years by Naomi Iizuka (Guthrie Theatre) and Night Over Erzinga by Adriana Sevahn-Nichols (Silk Road Rising).  Other Chicago credits include: Elliot: A Soldier’s Fugue by Quiara Alegría Hudes (Steppenwolf Garage with Teatro Vista and Rivendell Theatre Ensemble), Ski Dubai by Laura Jacqmin and Spare Change by Mia McCullough (Steppenwolf, First Look Rep), Permanent Collection by Thomas Gibbons (Northlight Theatre), The Piano Teacher by Julia Cho, In the Blood by Suzan-Lori Parks and Far Away by Caryl Churchill (Next Theatre), and Offspring of the Cold War by Carlos Murillo (Walkabout Theatre).  New York credits include: Wilder by Erin Cressida Wilson and the Red Clay Ramblers (Playwrights Horizons), How to Write While You Sleep by Madeleine Olnek, Hurricane by Erin Wilson and Fur by Migdalia Cruz (Soho Rep).  A director of new American plays and musicals, Lisa has directed numerous readings and workshops in such development programs as Sundance Summer Theatre Lab, Vineyard Arts Project, Eugene O’Neill Playwrights Conference, New Stages at Goodman Theatre, New Work Now at the Public Theatre, Mondays@3 at New York Theatre Workshop, the Cherry Lane Alternative, Hispanic Playwrights Project at South Coast Repertory Theatre, the McCarter Theatre Lab, and the Cape Cod Theatre Project.  Lisa served as the associate director for the Tony Award-winning musical, The Who’s Tommy mounting its international productions in Canada, the U.K., and Germany.  Awards include the NEA/TCG Career Development Grant, the Drama League Directing Fellowship and a Fulbright/Hays award. Lisa received her MFA in directing from the University of California, San Diego.

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